Plugged In Collaboration with 91.5 KRCC

We’ve recently started a new limited-run collaboration with KRCC about music we’re listening to. The posts will be shared on both the SoCC and KRCC websites; check out the first post below.

Plugged In is a limited-run web series for 91.5 KRCC Music in which contributors from Colorado College’s student radio station, The SOCC, tip us off to great new releases, under-the-radar favorites, and other music they can’t live without. 

Hey 91.5 KRCC listeners & readers. I’m Paulina Ukrainets, the online content manager for The Sounds of Colorado College, CC’s radio station and music blog. I’m also an intern with 91.5 KRCC’s Air Check. Below are some songs I’ve been listening to lately (though they’re not necessarily new), and a little bit about why I like them.

Saba ft. Chance the Rapper –– LOGOUT

Usually I’m not a big fan of the currently super-prevalent “trap” style of hip-hop production, but this song is different in its beautiful amalgamation of piano, sax, synth and the standard trap percussion beat. When I listen to most music (but especially to hip-hop) my attention instantly gravitates to the lyrics, and here they don’t disappoint: “look at how much fun I’m havin’/ain’t no beauty in the absence of broadcastin’ to your followers” are just two of Saba’s lines from the ridiculously catchy chorus. This is a hip-hop anthem for the age of Instagram––the age in which young, up-and-coming artists like Saba can get the recognition they clearly deserve, but at the price of the complete destruction of their privacy in the name of online presence/promotion. As my professor Idris Goodwin would say, LOGOUT is pure bars.

 

Frankie Cosmos –– Ur Up

This song is only 36 seconds long, so I kinda feel like I’m cheating with this one, but it’s full to the brim with the kind of sincerity Frankie Cosmos fans (myself included) adore her for. The lyrics and title of this song refer to a meme-esque phrase that gets used by teenagers as a sort of shorthand booty call… or so I’m told. Here, Greta (FC’s lyricist/frontwoman) mirrors the shorthand/meme-culture form of the phrase in the song’s brevity, but totally inverts the concept the phrase refers to. It rings honest and sweet, especially in the studio outtake at the beginning. I’m super grateful for this little Frankie Cosmos-shaped window into their creative process.

 

Honour Council –– Olingo

Honour Council are a Colorado Springs band that I’ve been a fan of since their formation, but this is the first recorded song they’ve shared with the world; I’m so excited to expose people to them! I find it hard to pin their sound down to a single word or genre––some people say they fit into the shoegaze realm, but I say you should just listen. If you like what you hear, come see them play a donation-based Cloud Factory show on May 5that local house venue, The Bump! They’re supporting Dead Sullivan, a really awesome indie band from Texas. Find more details of the event here.

Taylor McFerrin –– Degrees of Light

If this artist’s name sounds familiar, it’s because he’s the son of Bobby McFerrin (if you’re bad with names, he’s the “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” guy). Taylor’s music couldn’t be more different from his father’s––this song is totally instrumental, relying heavily on synths and electronic percussion that take you on a journey through what does feel like thousands of different degrees of light. Listen to this song, and you’ll hear how the sounds shimmer and reflect off each other. It’s the most multi-sensory listening experience I’ve had in a while.

Interview with Seal Eggs

Recently I did an interview with Gwen Wolfenbarger, more commonly known in the music community under her alias, Seal Eggs. She is incredible and the interview helped me learn a lot about her process; if you think you might want to do so too, listen to it here: http://krcc.org/post/exploring-disembodiment-and-human-voice-experimental-musician-seal-eggs

SONG OF THE WEEK: Okay Kaya –– IUD

I’m imploring you not to take this song too seriously; if you don’t, you’ll probably really like it. Okay Kaya (who’s also an actress and a model, and Porches’ girlfriend) has a gorgeous voice, and her lyrical talents have brought lines like “Maybe if you come with me/I will let you cum in me.” At its most serious, the song pays tribute to Planned Parenthood, amongst other feminist touches. At its lightest is the chorus––to find out why, you just gotta click play.

A Short Goodbye Note

Just wanted to write a belated goodbye note to Dolores O’Riordan, the frontwoman of the Cranberries, who passed away on Monday. The Cranberries, to my mind, will always be the kind of magic-making band whose sound is impossible to replicate, in large part because of Dolores’s voice. They’re also a band that I’ve bonded with a surprising amount of CC people over… So, if you, like me, are sad about so many talented musicians leaving us in the past little while, then here’s a little reminder for you that good art will outlast us all.

Song Of The Week: Pavement –– The Killing Moon

Just wanted to give Pavement a little bit of love and appreciation. This song is originally by Echo and the Bunnymen, but they put their own, slightly more melancholy spin on it. I don’t really feel like I have the ability to describe this song at all adequately enough to illicit in you the admiration it deserves, so just press play.

Alone Again (Naturally)

creds to Mitski for screenshot

It’s Wednesday of 3rd week. I’m on the I-25, crawling through rush hour traffic foggily towards Denver. The Cranberries ask me over the stereo if I have to let it linger. A little anxious pit in my stomach starts to open again; I push it down. My day, up to this point, has been a sort of tug-of-war between feeling really excited about the Tyler, The Creator show I’m currently on the way to see and the weird, soul-sucking feeling people’s responses have prompted in me when I told them I was going to the show alone.

     The first show I went to alone was an Alex G show in the summer after my senior year of high school. None of my friends had really started to like him yet, but I’d been listening to DSU non-stop since it came out, so I told myself I’d go. “I’m a big girl now,” I thought, “I can go to shows alone.”
     The hour-long train ride there consisted of me pushing down anxiety-nausea with big gulps of water. I would spend time obsessively thinking about what the people at the show might think when they see me alone. Then I’d tell myself that nobody would be paying enough attention to anybody else to notice that kinda thing. Then I’d get sad. You get the picture.
     That show was probably one of the best I’ve seen to date, slightly ruined by the fact that this girl (another alone-attender, though she had a “Press” badge to deflect the blame onto) would not stop following me around until my subway station on the way home. A part from her mild clinginess, there was nothing wrong with this girl––if anything, she seemed pretty sweet. Having experienced a small part of the show alone, though, I didn’t wanna turn back. Being in this small, 100-year-old basement, listening to Alex play guitar, his face covered in cake (don’t ask), felt really intimate. I wasn’t distracted; or, rather, nobody was distracting me. I was completely there, and it was really fucking wonderful. (Until Lindsay tapped me on the shoulder and asked what my name was. Bitch.)
     Go to shows alone! Or, rather, don’t let a lack of company stop you from seeing any bands live. CC is a more socially-focused environment than most, but even here, shows don’t exist for you to be seen. Shows exist for you to see, listen and pay attention to who’s on stage.
     The Tyler show was amazing. I took the empty spots by the stairs of the Ogden, left behind by a crowd of five k-holing teenagers that were being escorted out by the cops, as I walked in. For the next hour and a half, I just listened. It was the best night I’d had in a long time (maybe I really am a big girl now).

4th Week Playlist

Don’t let fourth week murder your sense of adequacy; groove on down with your confusion with Nelson Kies’ playlist of beautiful abstraction beats.

Song (and Video) Of The Week: King Krule -– “Czech One”

I haven’t posted on this website in a while, but in that while I’ve managed to fall completely into a bottomless pit of admiration/adoration for King Krule, and specifically for his new album The OOZ. If you’re interested in hearing him say the album title in his glorious British accent, or in learning more about how the album was made, check out the Beats 1 session he recorded in his bathroom-turned-brainspace: https://itunes.apple.com/us/station/king-krule-takeover/idra.1295672630

Right now, though, on this cold Colorado Tuesday evening, I want to bring your attention to the first single from The OOZ–– Czech One. Not only is the song just really fucking spaceously beautiful, but the video is one of the best music videos I’ve seen in some time. If your self-esteem needs a little hammering, King Krule (or Archy Marshall, the man behind the project) is 23 and the director of “Czech One,” Frank Lebon, is 20. (But don’t actually feel bad; they both come from ridiculously creative/artistic lineages, which is its own sort of privilege)

Anyway, here’s “Czech One”:

If you liked what you saw, you should check out (The OOZ, obviously, but also) the art collective that Frank Lebon is a part of: http://www.dobedo.co.uk/

picture taken from altcitizen.com

 

 

How Sound Makes Music

Over this past block, I made an episode of a podcast. It’s not completely about music, but it’s on how sound makes meaning, so I figured I would post it on here. In it, I interview two really wonderful members of the CC community, Jake Sabetta and Jane Hilberry (and if you’re on this website, you will likely at least know of Jake).

Hope you enjoy!

 

 

SONG OF THE DAY: Jay Som –– I Think You’re Alright

This little gem of a song popped up on my Discover Weekly this week, and the vocals instantly charmed me with their Frankie Cosmos-like easiness; if I were to describe Melina Duterte’s (the mastermind behind Jay Som) voice with a motion, that motion would definitely be floating, softly and lightly just above the melody. The guitar, especially in the solo near the end of the song, seems very reminiscent of Mitski, and since her and Frankie Cosmos are two of my favourite artists, it’s no surprise that this song caught my eye (or, I guess, ear). Plus, the self-proclaimed “most trusted voice in music” and our overall most favourite website, Pitchfork, gave Jay Som’s new album an 8.6 and oh-so-highly coveted Best New Music title, so she must be great. (But, seriously, give this song a listen).